13 Secrets Airline Pilots Won’t Tell You

Every been on a flight and experienced a rapid dip in altitude where everything starts to shake vigorously for a few minutes and then… swish, back to normal?

Flight attendants walk back down the aisle with gleaming smiles and an announcement from the cockpit is that of a chirpy captain sounding dismissive about the incident and blaming in on some bad turbulence.

At that exact point in time, how many of you have actually stopped and really asked yourself:

What really went on?

What are the pilots not telling us?

Well some questions are best remained unanswered… until now that is.

The folks are Good Morning America have teamed up with Reader’s Digest on a special series 13 Things Experts Won’t Tell You and the this month’s feature was around 13 secrets airline pilots won’t tell you.

By the time you finish reading this post, you would have wished those damn pilots just kept their mouths shut as this will 100% get you thinking next time you board a plane.

Below are the quotes from the pilots taken directly form this Reader’s Digest study.

Enjoy (and yeah, buckle up)

What You Don’t Want to Know

“I’m constantly under pressure to carry less fuel than I’m comfortable with. Airlines are always looking at the bottom line, and you burn fuel carrying fuel. Sometimes if you carry just enough fuel and you hit thunderstorms or delays, then suddenly you’re running out of gas and you have to go to an alternate airport.” -Captain at a major airline

“Sometimes the airline won’t give us lunch breaks or even time to eat. We have to delay flights just so we can get food.” -First officer on a regional carrier

“We tell passengers what they need to know. We don’t tell them things that are going to scare the pants off them. So you’ll never hear me say, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, we just had an engine failure,’ even if that’s true.” -Jim Tilmon, retired American Airlines pilot, Phoenix

“The Department of Transportation has put such an emphasis on on-time performance that we pretty much aren’t allowed to delay a flight anymore, even if there are 20 people on a connecting flight that’s coming in just a little late.” -Commercial pilot, Charlotte, N.C.

“The truth is, we’re exhausted. Our work rules allow us to be on duty 16 hours without a break. That’s many more hours than a truck driver. And unlike a truck driver, who can pull over at the next rest stop, we can’t pull over at the next cloud.” -Captain at a major airline

 

What Pilots Want You To Know!!!

“Some FAA rules don’t make sense to us either. Like the fact that when we’re at 39,000 feet going 400 miles an hour, in a plane that could hit turbulence at any minute, [flight attendants] can walk around and serve hot coffee and Chateaubriand. But when we’re on the ground on a flat piece of asphalt going five to ten miles an hour, they’ve got to be buckled in like they’re at NASCAR.” -Jack Stephan, US Airways captain based in Annapolis, Md., who has been flying since 1984

“The two worst airports for us: Reagan National in Washington, D.C., and John Wayne in Orange County, Calif. You’re flying by the seat of your pants trying to get in and out of those airports. John Wayne is especially bad because the rich folks who live near the airport don’t like jet noise, so they have this noise abatement procedure where you basically have to turn the plane into a ballistic missile as soon as you’re airborne.” -Pilot, South Carolina

“At some airports with really short runways, you’re not going to have a smooth landing no matter how good we are: John Wayne Airport; Jackson Hole, Wyoming; Chicago Midway; and Reagan National.” -Joe D’Eon, a pilot at a major airline who produces a podcast at flywithjoe.com

“I may be in uniform, but that doesn’t mean I’m the best person to ask for directions in the airport. We’re in so many airports that we usually have no idea.” -Pilot for a regional carrier, Charlotte, N.C.

“This happens all the time: We’ll be in Pittsburgh going to Philly, and there will be a weather delay. The weather in Pittsburgh is beautiful. Then I’ll hear passengers saying, ‘You know, I just called my friend in Philly, and it’s beautiful there too,’ like there’s some kind of conspiracy or something. But in the airspace between Pittsburgh and Philly there’s a huge thunderstorm.” -Jack Stephan

“You may go to an airline website and buy a ticket, pull up to its desk at the curb, and get onto an airplane that has a similar name painted on it, but half the time, you’re really on a regional airline. The regionals aren’t held to the same safety standards as the majors: Their pilots aren’t required to have as much training and experience, and the public doesn’t know that.” -Captain at a major airline

“Most of the time, how you land is a good indicator of a pilot’s skill. So if you want to say something nice to a pilot as you’re getting off the plane, say ‘Nice landing.’ We do appreciate that.” -Joe D’Eon

“No, it’s not your imagination: Airlines really have adjusted their flight arrival times so they can have a better record of on-time arrivals. So they might say a flight takes two hours when it really takes an hour and 45 minutes.” -AirTran Airways captain, Atlanta

A BIG and special shout-out to the team at GMA and Reader’s Digest for putting this survey together.. for more information on the entire series click here.

Have a good flight and see you on the other side!

Comments

  1. amandaddyer says:

    Reblogged this on Amanda Dyer and commented:
    13 Secrets Airline Pilots Won’t Tell You

  2. Very interesting post. Channel 4, the UK public TV channel, recently ran a documentary on one European budget airline and how they always carry dangerously close to the minimum amount of fuel, and the potential consequences if the flight is diverted. Most of their pilots spoke anonymously about their concerns, but one was identified. He and the channel are now being sued by the airline. In the current economic climate this is bound to remain a cause for concern. Scary stuff.

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